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Peru’s ‘Lord of Miracles’ carried in massive five-hour procession from St. Patrick’s Cathedral through the streets of New York City…

In the middle of the most populated city in the United States, a procession shook the hearts of believers: the ‘Lord of Miracles’ toured “The Big Apple” on Oct. 17. The Peruvian community along, with many other foreigners, processed through 5th Avenue with a replica of the indestructible Lord of Miracles (Señor de los Milagros) image after Cardinal Timothy Dolan and Peruvian Msgr. Guillermo Cornejo concelebrated with a special Mass for the occasion. [See also: The Lord of Miracles: The Amazing Story of Peru’s Indestructible Sacred Image] Here’s the Peruvian image left St. Patrick’s Cathedral: [embedded content]Click here if you cannot see the video above. The photographs portrayed an incredible moment of faith, homage, devotion and reverence that perhaps only conveys the particular Latin A...

Have you ever received fake messages from your “priest?” Internet scammers see churches as easy prey, simple precautions can provide enormous protection…..

Father David Mullen got the message every pastor dreads to hear thanks to 21st-century technology: “I think someone hacked your account.” An internet scammer had breached the Boston Archdiocese’s priests’ account back in August, looked at the content of his emails, and then proceeded to email people in his address book saying he needed to talk with the recipient “about something personal.”  Thankfully, the recipients noted something seemed off: For one thing, the pastor wouldn’t approach them via email that way, and he seemed to use “terminology that I wouldn’t typically use on an email.” The pastor quickly got the word out to his parishioners through the parish’s communications platforms that his email had been hacked and to be wary of any emails appearing to come from him that look ...

Liechtenstein archbishop opts out of synodal process, saying it runs “the risk of becoming ideological”…

Haas, who was born in Vaduz, previously served as bishop of the Swiss diocese of Chur. Amid internal tensions, he was appointed in 1997 as the first archbishop of Vaduz, which was previously part of the Chur diocese. The archdiocese, which emcompasses the whole Principality of Liechtenstein and whose website lists just 12 parishes, does not belong to a national bishops’ conference and has no suffragan sees. Explaining why he felt that the archdiocese did not need to take part in the global process, Haas said: “On the one hand, the close relationships in our parishes allow for quick and uncomplicated mutual contact between pastors and laity, so that an intellectual and spiritual exchange has always been, and still is, possible.” “All those who wish to do so can enter into dialogue with one ...

16 tips to improving your parish hospitality…

Every parish has visitors, but not every visit is the same. Are your visitors having a positive experience? Will they come back? Do they feel welcomed? How is our hospitality to these visitors? Think of the last time you visited another parish for the first time. Did you know where to park? Did you find your way around easily? Did you feel welcomed? Were you a bit nervous? What was positive about the experience and what was negative? Many Catholic disciples are able to look beyond the negatives in a parish, because they are insiders who understand the reality of the Eucharist. But, most outsiders to our parishes are unable to do the same and they may focus on the externals we may gloss over. The challenge for us is to see our parishes through the eyes of our visitors, so we can b...

Can we drink the cup Jesus drank?

29th Sunday in Ordinary Time James and John, the sons of Zebedee, approach Jesus asking for a favor: “Grant that in your glory we may sit one at your right and the other at your left.” Jesus says to them, “You do not know what you are asking. Can you drink the cup that I drink…?” They respond, “We can!” Jesus answers them, “The cup that I drink, you will drink… but to sit at my right or at my left is not mine to give but is for those for whom it has been prepared.” Jesus told James and John, “You do not know what you are asking,” but how well do we understand what Jesus is saying here? What was the cup that Jesus would drink? How would Jesus be enthroned in glory? And who got those places at his right and his left? The answers are found in the gospel accounts of the Passion. Jesus, the nig...

Omaha #2: Fr. Michael Gutgsell has been in the Catholic news before, as rector of the cathedral decorated with Buddha and Mary Poppins in 2016…

Annually, the Archdiocese of Omaha puts on the Cathedral Flowers Festival and this year’s theme was “A Night at the Movies”. The rector of St. Cecilia’s Cathedral, Fr. Michael Gutgsell, made arrangements to have the nave decorated as usual. One of the long-time members and current custodians decided to take matters into his own hands. According to Omaha World-Herald columnist Michael Kelly, Mark Kenney, who grew up as a member of the parish, had a private meeting with his rector just days before he made his decision. Fr. Gutgsell knew that Kenney had differing opinions on the use of the consecrated space for the event, and he asked him to make a promise not to interfere with any of the displays. However, when Kenney walked into the Cathedral on Jan. 29, he couldn’t beli...

3 reasons everyone should try anonymous Confession behind the screen…

I knew I had to go to confession at St. Peter’s Basilica. But I never guessed my confession there would change the direction of my life. While growing up in a Catholic family and attending Catholic school, I went to confession twice each year—once in Advent and once in Lent. When I studied abroad during college in 2006, I spent a week in Rome, and something in me urged me to step outside of my biannual tradition and go to confession at St. Peter’s. This urge was unusual because for me, every instance of confession prior to that day in Rome (especially after I hit puberty), had been preceded by a deep feeling of dread. On the one hand, I believed in God’s mercy and was glad to receive it. On the other hand, I did not enjoy speaking face-to-face with a priest I did not know about the most in...

Sicilian Catholic diocese bans godparents. Yes, it’s partly due to Mafia godfathers…..

Earlier this month, the Roman Catholic dioceses of Catania, in Sicily, put a three-year pause on godparents, Jason Horowitz reports at The New York Times. “Church officials argue that the once-essential figure in a child’s Catholic education has lost all spiritual significance,” and that god-parenting has “fallen to earth as a secular custom between relatives or neighbors — many deficient in faith or living in sin, and was now a mere method of strengthening family ties. And sometimes mob ties, too.” “It’s an experiment,” Msgr. Salvatore Genchi, the vicar general of Catania, told the Times. He estimated that 99 percent of the diocese’s godparents were not spiritually fit for the role. Fr. Angelo Alfio Mangano at Cataina’s Saint Mar...

The second conclave: A Polish cardinal returns to Rome in late 1978…..

Today in Papal History marks the day in which the Cardinal Archbishop of Kraków, Karol Wojtyla, entered the conclave that would elect him pope. Look at that face. Share Today in Papal History This was the year’s second conclave in as many months, thanks to the untimely death of (the soon-to-be-Blessed) Pope John Paul I, who reigned for just 33 days before dying of a sudden heart attack. As the story goes, Cardinal Wojtyla had suspected he might be elected pope – after all, according to Jason Evert’s great book on John Paul II, a poem by the famous Pole Juliusz Slowacki a century earlier seems to have foretold it: Amid discord God strikesAt an immense bell,For a Slavic pope Open is the throne…Boldly like God, he bravely face the sword;For him the world is dust…So behold, here comes the...

America needs to want a Catholic politics…

“Does America need a Catholic politics?” Or, in other words, does our broken political landscape, divided between two rival emphases of the same liberal individualism, need the healing balm of communal solidarity and personal dignity offered by the Church’s social application of the teachings of Jesus Christ?  That was ostensibly the topic question at an Oct. 13 panel discussion hosted by the Institute for Human Ecology at the Catholic University of America.  But the answer to this query seems to be so obviously “yes!” that the participants — which included New York Times columnist Ross Douthat as moderator, and The Lamp’s Matthew Walther and Commonweal’s Paul Baumann as discussants — instead spent the hour and half focusing on a far more difficult pair of questions: Does America...

A tsunami may be headed for prosecutors in the Vatican’s “trial of the century”…

ROME – Somewhere out in the ocean right now, a small buoy is measuring wave direction and speed, along with barometric pressure and water temperature, feeding that data back to observatories. Even small upticks or downticks may signal the first stirrings of what could become a devastating storm. You don’t need special equipment, however, to detect warning signs right now of a legal tsunami that may be heading for the prosecution in the Vatican’s “trial of the century,” which pivots on a $400 million London real estate deal gone wrong, and, for the first time ever, features a cardinal in the dock. On Wednesday, the penal section of the Italian Supreme Court dismissed an arrest order that had been issued at the request of Vatican prosecutors for Gianluigi Torzi, a London-based Italian financ...

The race for chairman of the USCCB liturgy committee is strange: One candidate doesn’t use the Roman Missal, and the other is known for his sacramental ineptitude…

When the U.S. bishops meet next month in Baltimore, part of the business of their fall assembly will be to elect new chairs for five of their standing committees.  Often, these elections throw up candidates from recognizably different wings or strains of opinion within the conference, and set the tone for one school of thought or another to shape a committee’s work.  But this year, the race to chair the bishops’ liturgy committee features an interesting pair of choices, Archbishop Mitchell Rozanski of St. Louis and Bishop Stephen Lopes of the Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter. Neither appears an obvious selection for the job, which might suggest that some potential candidates have steered clear of running for a seat on the third rail of American ecclesiastical life. Image cre...