Center

Why Obi-Wan Kenobi loved the Latin Mass…

While actor Alec Guinness is most widely known for his foundational role as Obi-Wan Kenobi in the original trilogy of the Star Wars films, he was also a Catholic convert. In fact, by the time he portrayed Obi-Wan Kenobi, Guinness had been Catholic for around 20 years and would frequently make retreats at Catholic monasteries, witnessing the prayer lives of monks…possibly helping his portrayal of Obi-Wan as a wise, religious hermit. Guinness grew-up Anglican, but was more of an atheist, while still holding an interest in religious matters. During the horrors of World War II, an Anglican priest gave Guinness a copy of St. Francis de Sales’s Introduction to the Devout Life. This was the beginning of his introduction to Catholicism. Next he portrayed G.K. Chesterton’s Father Brown&nb...

“Think of a number.” How do math magicians know your number? Here’s how it’s done…..

Math has a certain logic to it. If you use it to accurately describe a situation, sometimes you can predict the inevitable — for instance, the moment an eclipse will take place — centuries in advance. To those unfamiliar with the math behind the prediction, this outcome might seem like magic. Indeed, the science fiction author Arthur C. Clarke famously wrote, “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.” In today’s Insights puzzle we’ll explore four examples of mathematical magic that can seem, at first glance, like mind reading. Just like stage magic, these examples can leave you wondering, “How did they know that?” Many of us have experienced this as children. We are asked by a friend to think of a certain number without revealing it. We are then asked to do a s...

A very Pelosi newsletter (and some other stuff too)…

Hey everybody, It’s a pretty cold day here in Colorado, and this is The Tuesday Pillar Post. There’s a lot to talk about – namely, Nancy Pelosi and Archbishop Sal Cordileone, so let’s get to it, shall we? San Francisco news You know, or most of you do, that on Friday Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone announced that Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi may not be admitted to Holy Communion in the Archdiocese of San Francisco. We emailed you about that on Friday, and lot of you read our report already, but in case you didn’t, here’s our initial report on that announcement. The archbishop’s move was an application of canon 915 of the Code of Canon Law, which says that Catholic “obstinately persevering in manifest grave sin should not be admitted to Holy Communion.” Perhaps you’ve got questio...

‘But only say the word’ — What every Catholic needs to know about receiving Holy Communion…

Since the Eucharist and the proper disposition to receive it is in the news, let’s review.  The present day encouragement for all to receive Communion, simply because they are Catholic, desire to receive, and judge, themselves, that they should and can based on that desire — well, that’s not consistent with Catholic practice from any point in its history. Throughout that history, when Catholics have been encouraged to revisit their practices and receive the Eucharist more frequently and regularly, it has never been in the context of a concern that individuals not feel excluded from the table or feel like “sinners.” It has always been exhorted in the context of a call for individuals to deepen their spiritual lives, turn away from sin and conform themselves more closely to Christ. The ...

Some think this generation is the first to get everything right. In 100 years another generation will laugh at them. But the Church, built upon rock, will endure…..

6th Sunday of EasterBy Fr. Victor Feltes There was a serious religious controversy in the very early Church. The Acts of the Apostles records this story which contains important lessons for you and me and Christ’s one, holy, catholic, and apostolic Church in every age. In the first century A.D., some Jewish Christians came down to Antioch and were telling the Christians there: “Unless you are circumcised according to the Mosaic practice, you cannot be saved.” Many of the Christians in Antioch were Gentile converts. As Gentiles they had not followed the many Jewish religious laws, including circumcision. Now they were being told they had no share in Jesus Christ’s New Covenant unless they kept the entire Mosaic Covenant. This was a crucial matter: either these Gentiles were not yet experien...

Here is something about which a husband (and wife) can be intentional, to do marriage more fully…..

“Likewise, you should know that you will be so close to your husband that wherever he goes he will carry the memory, recollection, and reminder of you. You notice it in all married couples, for as soon as we see the husband, we ask him, ‘How is your wife?’ and as soon as we see the wife, we ask her, ‘How is your husband?’ for that’s how closely the wife is connected to the husband.”The Good Wife’s Guide (A medieval book on marriage) There is a beautiful phenomenon especially noticeable in some couples. Upon seeing one spouse you immediately think of the other. Somehow, where there is one there is also the other. This calls for a closer consideration. There is an objective spousal bond constituted by the marriage vows. Once formed, this bond transcends how the spouses happen to feel or act ...

Pope’s Sunday Regina Coeli: ‘Ask the Lord for the Spirit of Peace’…

By Thaddeus Jones Speaking to pilgrims gathered in St. Peter’s Square, Pope Francis recalled the Gospel in today’s liturgy when Jesus bid farewell to his disciples at the Last Supper, saying “Peace I leave with you,” and immediately adding “My peace I give to you.”  “Peace I leave with you” These words express Jesus’ affection and serenity, despite the moment being anything but serene, since Judas left to betray him, Peter is about to deny him and almost others will abandon him, the Pope observed, yet the Lord remains calm and kind to the end.  These last hours of Jesus’ life sum up the essence of his entire life, the Pope explained, and while he feels fear and pain, he does not give way to bitterness or anger; “He is at peace, a peace th...

Roe v. Wade was never a ‘law’ in the first place…

The Supreme Court is not a legislative body — while it can make judicial rulings, it cannot make law. “Roe v. Wade is the law of the land.” This phrase has been uttered millions of times since Jan. 22, 1973. Whether they want Roe upheld or struck down, Americans largely agree with that assertion. Problem is, the statement is 100% wrong. Roe was not law in 1973. It is not law now. Judge Harry Blackmun’s majority decision in Roe v. Wade was a court opinion, not a law. Blackmun wanted it to become law. He professed it should be law. He wrote the decision as if it were a law. As Justice Samuel Alito writes in his recently leaked decision, “The scheme Roe produced looked like legislation, and the Court provided the sort of explanation that might be expected from a legislative body.” Alito conti...

Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s Communion Ban: 5 Key Takeaways…

Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone of San Francisco has formally barred Speaker Nancy Pelosi from receiving Holy Communion “until such time as you publically [sic] repudiate your advocacy for the legitimacy of abortion and confess and receive absolution of this grave sin in the sacrament of Penance.” His decision was communicated not only via a direct letter to Speaker Pelosi, who resides in the archdiocese, but also in separate correspondences to the priests and laity of San Francisco.  Here are some significant takeaways from the decision and the reasons behind it. It’s Pastoral, Not Political During 2021’s months-long controversy over whether the U.S. bishops should issue a document explicitly prohibiting pro-abortion Catholic politicians from receiving Holy Communion, a common refrai...

The most beautiful public gardens around the world, according to tourist reviews…

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Sigrid Undset saw modern man’s false hope, and became a Catholic…

COMMENTARY: The Nobel laureate discovered that ‘only a supernatural intervention can save us from ourselves. The Christian Church teaches that Christ was Himself this intervention.’ It’s a “This, not that” kind of convert story. Sigrid Undset entered the Church in 1924, having already become famous for the novel Kristin Lavransdatter, a profoundly Catholic story set in medieval Norway. She received the Nobel Prize in literature four years later. She told the story in an essay titled “Beyond Human Limitations,” in which she made devastatingly clear what mistakes she rejected on the way to the Catholic Church. It appeared in 1939 in a book called Through Hundred Gates: By Noted Converts From Twenty-Two Lands. The 41 stories include only a few people American readers will recognize: Chesterto...

Why it’s so difficult to figure out what the Vatican thinks about Ukraine…

Listen to this story: ROME – Next Tuesday will mark three months of war in Ukraine. Many things remain unclear about the conflict, perhaps chief among them what Russian President Vladimir Putin’s endgame may be. In Catholic terms, however, the great unknown at the three-month mark is what, exactly, Pope Francis and his Vatican team make of the situation. So pronounced is the confusion that recently, four prominent Catholic authors, all seen as basically pro-Francis, penned a lengthy piece noting that the Russian Orthodox Church is claiming the Vatican as an ally in the conflict, and insisting that the pontiff needs to make the Vatican’s position clear. Among the co-authors was Massimo Faggioli of Villanova University, one of the most outspoken defenders of Pope Francis in the United States...