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Let’s study the impact of the Traditional Latin Mass…

COMMENTARY: The U.S. bishops will likely discover considerable evidence that proliferation of traditional Latin Masses has been largely a unifying force in the Church — worshippers have been brought into the parishes where youthful zeal is having a noticeable impact. In Traditionis Custodes (Guardians of the Tradition), the motu proprio that sets out provisions for curtailing the availability of the Mass based on the 1962 Missal promulgated by Pope St. John XXIII (here referred to as the traditional Latin Mass), Pope Francis states that his decisions are based on consultations with bishops worldwide (the results of which have never been made public).  Thanks be to God, most of the U.S. bishops who have issued a statement about the motu proprio have granted permission for the status qu...

How extraordinary is the Extraordinary Form? The frequency of the ‘usus antiquior,’ analyzed…

Pope Francis last Friday promulgated canonical legislation that significantly restricts the celebration of the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite.  Credit: Thoom / Shutterstock. The motu proprio Traditionis custodes has been discussed extensively in some Catholic circles and prompted a variety of responses from bishops. It has also left some people wondering how many American Catholics actually attend Mass in the Extraordinary Form. At The Pillar, we decided to find out. And while we couldn’t quantify the number of Catholics who actually attend the Extraordinary Form, we did learn a few things worth noting. There is no central registry of all Masses said in the United States or in the world. While the Church is a world-wide institution with the pope at its head, individual parish, o...

Why children need real heroes and true history…

2 minutes Summary Simply put, opines John Clark, do not make heroes of men and women unless you want your children to grow up to be like these particular men and women. Some claim that the main reason to learn history is to avoid the past mistakes of others. While there is admittedly some benefit to learning history for that reason, this is nevertheless a merely negative prohibition. But from a Catholic perspective—from a human perspective—the main reason to study history has a superlatively positive motivation. It is to learn virtue. As all the Seton students know, my father has a great love of history. As we grew up, my father regaled my brothers and me with stories of great military commanders, epic battles, and good political leaders. Whether or not he was intending to teach us heroism...

Pope’s clampdown on Traditional Latin Mass brings mourning from some, gloating from others…

ROME – Pope Francis’s decision to restrict celebration of the pre-Vatican II Latin Mass, effectively rolling back wider permission granted under Pope emeritus Benedict XVI, is being met by predictably mixed reaction from Catholics around the globe, with some praising the move as prophetic and others calling it a stain on Francis’s legacy. Speaking to Crux, liturgy expert and editor at the New Liturgical Movement blog Gregory DiPippo said that when he heard the news, he was filled with “profound sadness and dismay at the idea that the pope would so cruelly mistreat so many of the faithful.” Papal biographer Austen Ivereigh, meanwhile, praised the pope’s decision on Twitter as, “A historic day. A bold move. A prophetic act.” “Benedict XVI told bishops at the time of his 2007 Summorum Po...

How to stop being an internet glutton — tips from a 4th-century monk John Cassian…

John Cassian lays down a few simple rules for those who struggle with intemperance Recently, during one of my few undistracted times of reading I came across a striking passage in John Cassian’s Conferences. I was intrigued by the first-person account of a particular monk: “I was never able altogether to get rid of the incentives to gluttony. For though I reduce the quantity of food which I take to the smallest possible amount, yet I cannot avoid the force of its daily solicitations, but must be perpetually ‘dunned’ by it, and be making as it were interminable payments by continually satisfying it, and pay never-ending toll at its demand.” While gluttony is certainly a temptation in my life, though my vocation has not lead me to the austerity of the monastic life, this monk’s a...

The indicted Cardinal Becciu has now filed (or threatened to file) around 10 lawsuits against media outlets and other critics…

ROME – Though it hardly made a dent in the weekend’s news cycle given Pope Francis’s bombshell crackdown on the Latin Mass, Italian Cardinal Angelo Becciu announced his latest lawsuit Saturday, in this case suing an Italian newspaper called La Verità for defamation over a report regarding movements of money in Becciu’s home diocese in Sardinia. In effect, the report claimed that Becciu caused around three million Euro, most of it from the Vatican’s Secretariat of State and the Italian bishops’ conference, to be deposited in an account of a branch of Caritas in the Diocese of Ozieri in Sardinia, an account which, at the time, was controlled by his brother. From there, the Verità report claimed, much of the money was either spent for non-charitable ends or simply disappeared. A statement fro...

Traditional Latin Mass, Canada’s residential schools, fear of schism, and Father James Martin’s alarm at The Pillar story…

By Phil Lawler ( bio – articles – email ) | Jul 20, 2021 | In Quick Hits Horrified by today’s blockbuster story from Pillar, the ubiquitous Father James Martin, SJ, worries that if Catholic journalists are going to investigate cell-phone usage, we should all be worried. Why? If you could obtain my cell-phone records, you’d find them mighty boring. Why would someone assume that there’s damaging information in anyone’s private records? But that’s just one quick thought, on a day when I set out to catch up with some of the more interesting commentary from other outlets: These are undeniably contentious times in the Catholic Church. Some people—including critics of the Catholic Culture enterprise—argue that loyal Catholics should not focus on the difficulties within the Church. “We...

A cry from the heart about ‘Traditionis Custodes’ and the Latin Mass…

Many have already written well of the concerns and heartache elicited by the Pope’s motu proprio, Traditionis Custodes, which sets strict norms limiting the celebration of the Traditional Latin Mass. I have celebrated in this “extraordinary form” (as well as the ordinary form) for more than 32 years and written often of it. Hence, I seek to add my voice.  I must say that I am grieved and stunned by this document and the letter to the bishops that accompanied it. I think not so much of my own potential loss but of the many Catholics I have served who love the extraordinary form. For so long and in so many places they have often been treated harshly and have been marginalized for their love for the form of the liturgy that most of the saints knew.  Pope Benedict and Pope St. John P...

“Where there is incense there is fire.” True, but reporters can seek voices in the middle of that war…

Raise your hand if you are old enough to remember the Vietnam era. That may sound like a strange question to ask after a weekend of reading the tsunami of online reactions to the decision by Pope Francis to all but crush the 2007 Summorum Pontificum apostolic letter by the now retired Pope Benedict XVI, the document defending the use of the old Latin Mass, now called the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite. Now the fighting — another sign of real divisions between Catholic bishops almost everywhere — will almost certainly be turned up to 11. As Father Raymond J. de Souza of the National Catholic Register put it: “Where there is incense there is fire.” This brings me back to Vietnam. Here’s the phrase that jumped into my mind, about an hour or two into watching the firestorm on Catholic Tw...

Do your children a favor — be a burden on them. They will thank you for it in Heaven…..

They may very well get to thank you some day — at the Pearly Gates. It’s almost cliché. Those of the “Greatest Generation” absolutely, positively do not want to be a “burden” on their children. This generation of people who gave so much for so many couldn’t (and can’t) imagine putting their children in a position of having to sacrifice for them. On the surface, this would seem like yet another selfless action on their part. But is it? Could pride also be a factor here? It can be embarrassing to have to have your kids take very personal care of you. I get it. And don’t get me wrong: There is certainly a selfless quality associated with going out of one’s way to not put one’s children out. However, I propose that this seemingly thoughtful mindset has had some very dire, unintended consequenc...

The Pope’s motu proprio: Why this, why now, and how does it build up the Church?

Most of the episcopal statements I’ve seen so far have been…status quo. The official statement from the USCCB is here. It strikes me as a verbal sort of head desk gesture. As in “Well, that happened. Thnx.” Two other (out of many) of note. Christopher Altieri at CWR. The fact of the matter is that the law Pope Francis promulgated on Friday is cumbersome and unwieldy. It will require bishops to dedicate time and energy – sometimes enormous quantities of both – to a thankless project for which they didn’t really ask, and from which they cannot expect any measure of good will. Most laity in most parishes don’t care either way, while the faithful who are devoted to the older forms of worship are highly motivated. Now, they have their dander piqued. The bishops of the world know it, and as they...

Noelle Mering: How Christians should respond to the Woke revolution…

July 15, 2021 “It seems like this is a cultural revolution that’s bloodless — or seemingly bloodless, although I do think that there’s human casualties, for sure — but I think it’s really hard to see it,” said Noelle Mering, author of “Awake, Not Woke: A Christian Response to the Cult of Progressive Ideology” (TAN Books). She is a writer and an editor, and also a fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center. See more at NoelleMering.com and follow her @Noellem on Twitter. Share | Download(Loading) Join Our Telegram Group : Salvation & Prosperity